Genetic and DNA Shows
Newer shows are on top of the following list

  • Daniel Horowitz, the Genealogy Expert at MyHeritage, talked about the company future use of DNA. Jim Bartlett from segmentology.org gave additional information about using DNA results.
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  • Israel Pickholtz talked about his new book Endogamy: One Family, One People Paperback
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  • Arline Sachs discussed the different DNA tests used for genealogy.
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  • Guest Willliam Howard III discussed the different DNA tests used for genealogy and the differences between the three main genealogy testing companies.
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  • How Jim Bartlett used autosomal DNA testing.
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  • Jim Bartlett talked about the results from autosomal DNA testing from the different companies.

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  • Our hosts talked about how to use your DNA results.
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  • Whit Athey, Ph.D. talked about a subset (called subclade) of Y Haplogroup J2b which he wrote about in the Journal of Genetic Genealogy. Men in this group have a repeat value of 8 on DYS455 and have been identified to be Ashkenazi and Cohanim. (Note: The producer of this show was one of the persons tested within this subclade.)
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  • Greg Lennon, a PhD geneticist who worked on NIH genome project explained that the true value of DNA testing for medical projections is still years off. More can be learned from ones own family history than from paying to get it done. However he favors free testing for non-profit research. He explained some very interesting unknown facts such as even within a single person, the there could be small changes within the DNA. Also identical twins do not have identity genes. He mentioned SNPedia.com a free web site which shares information about the effects of variations in DNA in peer-reviewed scientific publications.
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  • Matthew E. Kaplan of the Human Origins Genotyping Laboratory at the University of Arizona, talked about different ways DNA is used. Included were National Geographic and IBM's Genographic Project , genealogical testing by Family Tree DNA, the DNA Shoah Project, and conservation genetics.
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  • Sydney Mandelbaum, project co-founder; Matthew E. Kaplan, research coordinator; and Janette Friedman, board member talked about the DNA Shoah Project. They are building a database of genetic material from Holocaust survivors and their immediate descendants in hopes of reuniting families disrupted by the Shoah (“Holocaust” in Hebrew).
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  • "Using DNA to find family" with Arline Sachs and Richard DiBuono.
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  • Herbert Huebscher talked about WIRTH surname DNA group with Family Tree DNA of which he is the administrator. He began testing others with his surname. None of them matched him. However, he matched another person with an different surname. Over time more men were tested;, now there are 43 families for this subset from Eastern Europe and Spain. The common ancester could be any where between 1200 and 1700. Since some of the group are Levites, this indicated that they all should be also, but in several families this knowledge was lost. Future plans include making a group tree to show where each family fits. He also told about some interesting facts of the some of the participants in his group.
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  • Bennett Greenspan, President and CEO of Family Tree DNA, talked about how to determine whether two males are relative by the testing of the DNA's Y chromosome. His company has such a large data base that everyone should find some match. Having additional markers tested will reduce the number of generations back of the common ancestor. The DNA can show where you come from and could identify a Semetic or other ancester group. Mr. Greenspan explained how the sample are taken and the steps his company take to eliminate the possiblity of laboratory error.
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  • Sonia Rosa-Velez and Eliud Bonilla both with long family histories of living in Puerto Rico talked about what happened when their families had their DNA tested. Both were surprised that they have the J2 haplotype that is very common among Jews, leading them to suspect that their ancestors were ‘hidden Jews'. [Sonia Rosa-Velez web site].
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    For information about the series, e-mail the producer Sidney Sachs.

    © Sidney Sachs, 2005-15